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Welcome to the Northeast Washington

Census Outreach

The Decennial Census is a unique chance for everyone to count by being counted! This is why this page exists, and this is the goal of this outreach.

The Decennial Census is a unique chance for everyone to count by being counted! This is why this page exists, and this is the goal of this outreach.

Five Counties in particular, Pend Oreille, Stevens, Ferry, Lincoln, and Adams, obtained a grant through the Washington State Census Equity Fund to make sure that we obtain the truest possible count of all the residents of these Northeast Washington Counties.

Why does this matter?

Representation at the Federal and State level is determined by Census data, as is billions of dollars in Federal Programs that are informed by the data the Census collects. 

Photo by Juliane Liebermann

CENSUS FAQs

Read all about the 2020 Decennial Census, cut through rumors and misinformation, and learn how it serves us. 

mountain and sky

TRIBAL OUTREACH

Get information about Events and Outreach to the Colville Confederated Tribes, Spokane Tribe, and Kalispel Tribe

Stay Connected!

Follow our social media channels to get up-to-date information and share with others. Let’s spread the word about the 2020 Decennial Census and why it is so important to all of us!

Spread the word!

Please share this page with people you know, work with, go to church with, go to school with, or simply share a coffee with on occasion. The message is important, and the outcome lasts for ten years!

More Information

FAQs About the 2020 Decennial Census

What is the Census?

The Decennial Census is an operation to count everyone where they reside in the United States and Puerto Rico every 10 years. It is required by the Constitution of the United States in order to determine the number of representatives each state has in the House of Representatives. Additionally, the data gathered informs how and where we spend billions of dollars across each community in the United States and where we draw new lines that determine elections, emergency services, and school boundaries. For more detailed information, click here.

[Hot Topic] What are the rumors and misinformation that goes around about the Census?

There is a lot of misinformation and concern that there is a citizenship question.

No there isn’t.

There's a rumor the Census information I provide can be used against me somehow.

It cannot by law, specifically US Code Title 13. Your data cannot be shared with any agency, law enforcement, court, or anyone else at any level of government.

I heard I can only reply by mail.

Incorrect, this is the first Census that you can reply by mail, internet and phone.

I thought the Census isn’t a big deal and you can just not respond.

This especially isn’t true. For ever person not counted in Washington, you community stands to lose $30,000 per person.

Additionally, participation in the Census is required by everyone in America, with the only exception of friends or family visiting for a short time (as in a vacation) from another country.

For more detailed information about rumors, click here.

How will the 2020 Decennial Census Work?

In March 2020, most US households will receive an invitation to participate in the 2020 Census. It will inform them that they can respond by internet, phone, or mail.

Census Day in America will officially be on April 1, 2020.

If you do not self-respond to the Census, you will receive several reminders. If no response is received after the reminders, Census takers will then go to your residence and collect the Census response from you.

It is far easier to spend a few short minutes replying as soon as possible. For more detailed information about Census operations, click here.

What questions will I be asked?

The Census asks a few simple questions about you, and those staying with you as of April 1, 2020. This means anyone living with you – regardless of family ties, citizenship, or any other reason.

And more importantly, your replies are safe and confidential AND cannot be used against you or anyone staying with you in any way at all! This is important to understand as this is the main reason people are fearful to respond.

None of the data you provide can be used against you or anyone in your household at all. It is against the law (Title 13) for Census employees to share your data with anyone else. For more detailed information about the Census Questions, click here.

Who should I include in my Census?

Include everyone staying with you, family, friend, or anyone in between. The only exception is a person who is the resident of another country that is only visiting you for a short time.

This seems simple enough, but sometimes other scenarios pop up that cause confusion.

  • How does your child who attends college in another state get counted?
  • How does a relative in a skilled nursing facility get counted?
  • A friend and their child are staying with you in between moves to an apartment?

The answer is: Where were they staying the majority of the time on April 1, 2020?

For more detailed information about Residence Rules, click here. Also, click here.

How will I respond?

You can send your Census by mail. Alternatively, this Census is the first time in the history that you have the option of responding in two additional ways: by phone or by internet. 

Most residences in the United States will receive an invitation by mail to participate in the Census that will include a code. Use this code to respond online or by phone.

It takes just mere minutes to complete the Census, but the results of it will last for the next ten years! For more information about How to Respond to the Census, click here.

What/Who are considered Hard to Count Communities?

Hard to Count Communities (HTC) are individuals or groups of people that have circumstances that make them harder to count than others.

These include people who are hard to reach, contact, persuade to respond, or interview for the 2020 Census.

In rural communities like ours, the terrain may make it harder to contact some people more than others. Additionally, rumors and misinformation about the Census adds to a hesitation to self-respond.

By fighting misinformation, reaching out to everyone about the positive impacts that the Census has, and being vigilant about following up with HTC people and confirming they responded to the Census, we will have the most success!

For more information about HTC groups, click here. Also, click here for a map with helpful information.

What happens to the information I turn into the Census?

The data collected by the Census is only used in aggregate. This is a fancy way of saying only for statistical purposes minus any personally identifiable information, aka PII.

When your data is returned, the information that is specific to you as an exact person, is scrubbed from the data.

To personally identify you, there needs to be your name plus a few other bits of information that distinguishes who you are compared to someone else with your same name for example.

When that information is scrubbed, the only thing left is basic data that doesn’t specifically identify you any longer. And remember, Title 13 guarantees that Census data collected cannot be used against you in any way, by anyone.

For more information about Census Data, click here.

Tribal Census Outreach

Colville Confederated Tribes, Spokane Tribe, and Kalispel Tribe. 

This is the location where you can find out about Events and Outreach to the Colville Confederated Tribes, Spokane Tribe, and Kalispel Tribe.

When the Tribes have finalized events and points of contact, they will be listed here.

In the meantime

Follow our social media channels to get up-to-date information and share with others. Let’s spread the word about the 2020 Decennial Census and why it is so important to all of us!